Nº. 1 of  78

Quoz

comicbookcovers:

Doll Man #6, September 1943, cover by Al Bryant

"I don’t play with dolls, I play with ACTION FIGURES. See, this is an action figure of Doll Man. He has the proportionate strength and reflexes of a doll!"

comicbookcovers:

Doll Man #6, September 1943, cover by Al Bryant

"I don’t play with dolls, I play with ACTION FIGURES. See, this is an action figure of Doll Man. He has the proportionate strength and reflexes of a doll!"

Crowded Train

     Another elderly lady, struggling through the crush, reached the door of Dora’s carriage and addressed her neighbour. ‘Ah, there you are, dear, I thought you were nearer the front.’ They looked at each other rather gloomily, the standing lady leaning at an angle through the doorway, her feet trapped in a heap of luggage. They began a conversation about how they had never seen the train so full.

      Dora stopped listening because a dreadful thought had struck her. She ought to give up her seat. She rejected the thought, but it came back. There was no doubt about it. The elderly lady who was standing looked very frail indeed, and it was only proper that Dora, who was young and healthy should give her seat to the lady who could then sit next to her friend. Dora felt the blood rushing to her face. She sat still and considered the matter. There was no point in being hasty. It was possible of course that while clearly admitting that she ought to give up her seat she might nevertheless simply not do so out of pure selfishness. This would in some ways be a better situation than what would have been the case if it had simply not occurred to her at all that she ought to give up her seat. On the other side of the seated lady a man was sitting. He was reading his newspaper and did not seem to be thinking about his duty. Perhaps if Dora waited it would occur to the man to give his seat to the other lady? Unlikely. Dora examined the other inhabitants of the carriage. None of them looked in the least uneasy. Their faces, if not already buried in books, reflected the selfish glee which had probably been on her own a moment since as she watched the crowd in the corridor. There was another aspect to the matter. She had taken the trouble to arrive early, and surely ought to be rewarded for this. Though perhaps the two ladies had arrived as early as they could? There was no knowing. But in any case there was an elementary justice in the first comers having the seats. The old lady would be perfectly all right in the corridor. The corridor was full of old ladies anyway, and no one else seemed bothered by this, least of all the old ladies themselves! Dora hated pointless sacrifices. She was tired after her recent emotions and deserved a rest. Besides, it would never do to arrive at her destination exhausted. She regarded her state of distress as completely neurotic. She decided not to give up her seat.

      She got up and said to the standing lady ‘Do sit down here, please. I’m not going very far, and I’d much rather stand anyway.’

-The Bell, Iris Murdoch, pgs 9-10.

Coincidence

Two frames from Colonel Homer, from season 3 of The Simpsons. Originally aired on March 26, 1992, two years before Yahoo! and 6 years before Google.

The Things We Thought Could Kill Us

By the time of the Bills of Mortality [a seventeenth-century precursor to the death certificate], the list of things we thought could kill us had expanded dramatically. Yet, reading those bills today, you could be forgiven for failing to recognize them as an advance in public health. It was possible, in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England, to die of Bleach and of Blasted, of Cramp and of Itch, of Sciatica and of Lethargy. You could be carried off by Cut of the Stone, or King’s Evil, or Planet-Struck, or Rising of the Lights. You could succumb to Overjoy, which sounds like a decent way to go, or be Devoured by Lice, which does not. You could die of Stopping of the Stomach, or Head-Ach, or Chin-cough, or Teeth. You could die of Horseshoe Head, though don’t ask me how. You could die of being a Lunatick. You could die of, basically, death: Suddenly, Killed by Several Accidents, Found Dead in the Streets. You could die of Frighted and of Grief.

The New Yorker, April 7, 2014. “Final Forms,” by Kathryn Schulz. pg. 34

chrisreblogs:

doktor-blitz:

Nooooooooooooo

Hey, at least Hydra is now ultra sensitive and ultra sensible.

chrisreblogs:

doktor-blitz:

Nooooooooooooo

Hey, at least Hydra is now ultra sensitive and ultra sensible.

You look up to your heroes and you shouldn’t be intimidated by them; you should be inspired by them. Don’t look up at the poster on your wall and think, ‘Fuck, I can never do that.’ Look at the poster on your wall and think, ‘Fuck, I’m going to do that!’

Dave Grohl at last night’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony where he perfectly describes the role Nirvana played in my adolescence. Thank you Nirvana. Thank you forever.  (via harryandthepotters)

(via improv-is-easy)

broadcity:

Top photo: Last shot from our web series finale. May 2011

Bottom photo: Last shot of our Season 1 finale. Nov. 2013

drujohnston:

britajames:

sarahjburton:

chrisreblogs:

jonbershad:

beigeucb:

"Dad Jokes"
March 3rd, 2014

This is easily one of my top three favorite sketches I’ve written in my two and a half years on Maude Night.

Jon gives an absolutely incredible performance and nailed it from moment one. The support work from Lisa, Kelly, and Dan adds a ton and it’s super fun to listen to the audience’s reactions.

Proud of this little guy. Give it a watch please.

Surprising, genuine, sweet. Trusting the moment. Love this.

I really loved this sketch. LIKE LOVE LOVED

Top notch sketch! Very enjoyable! 

Fucking fantastic.

Jonny Marbles.

Nº. 1 of  78