Nº. 1 of  89

Quoz

npr:

There’s a tune that you’ve probably heard throughout your life. It’s nine notes long, and it’s almost always used to signal that something vaguely Asian is happening or is about to happen.

You know what I’m talking about. The tune’s most prominent role is probably in that 1974 song, “Kung Fu Fighting.” It comes in right as Carl Douglas is singing that anthemic “Oh-hoh-hoh-hoah.”

The tune is ubiquitous. And like many things that are just in the air, few ever ask where it came from. But we did.

How The ‘Kung Fu Fighting’ Melody Came To Represent Asia

Photo credits: (Top) Michael Putland/Getty Images and Courtesy of Martin Nilsson

(via sebsational)

claireayoublaughingatthings:

airspaniel:

drunkwario:

Anon hate from the late 1800’s.

What I love most about this is that this person was SO INCENSED at the recipient that they couldn’t even wait the days/weeks it would take for the mail to go through. No, they had to say “FUCK YOU” as soon as fucking possible and, AND, let the recipient that they were not done with the fuck you, nay, this was merely the first volley in what would undoubtably be a dressing down of Biblical proportions.

!!!!!

This is not from the 1800s. This version of the Western Union form was not used until the 1960s, as you can see in this telegram sent to JFK. Earlier versions looked different (1919, 1937, 1942) . But here’s some more: actual telegrams had text that was, in general, cut out and glued to the telegram form (for instance, this example from 1959), not actually typed onto the form. Occasionally, telegrams were typed directly onto the form, but if so this was done with a standard typewriter. The typeface here looks (to my untrained eye) like Futura, or a variant. Futura was invented in 1927, and would not be a typeface used for telegrams, as it would have to be set, which too time-intensive a process for telegrams. Also, notice that all the parts of the telegram that would normally indicate date, sender, et cetera, are not filled out. This is not a telegram that was ever sent.
So where is this from? Possibly an urban legend from the 1970s, according to this book about urban legends.The book gives no information about this being an actual telegram that was sent, it simply states that it was collected in 1978 by “an employee of [the] Pacific Telephone Company.” It seems to be a standard joke/urban legend in law firms and politics.

claireayoublaughingatthings:

airspaniel:

drunkwario:

Anon hate from the late 1800’s.

What I love most about this is that this person was SO INCENSED at the recipient that they couldn’t even wait the days/weeks it would take for the mail to go through. No, they had to say “FUCK YOU” as soon as fucking possible and, AND, let the recipient that they were not done with the fuck you, nay, this was merely the first volley in what would undoubtably be a dressing down of Biblical proportions.

!!!!!

This is not from the 1800s. This version of the Western Union form was not used until the 1960s, as you can see in this telegram sent to JFK. Earlier versions looked different (1919, 19371942) . But here’s some more: actual telegrams had text that was, in general, cut out and glued to the telegram form (for instance, this example from 1959), not actually typed onto the form. Occasionally, telegrams were typed directly onto the form, but if so this was done with a standard typewriter. The typeface here looks (to my untrained eye) like Futura, or a variant. Futura was invented in 1927, and would not be a typeface used for telegrams, as it would have to be set, which too time-intensive a process for telegrams. Also, notice that all the parts of the telegram that would normally indicate date, sender, et cetera, are not filled out. This is not a telegram that was ever sent.

So where is this from? Possibly an urban legend from the 1970s, according to this book about urban legends.The book gives no information about this being an actual telegram that was sent, it simply states that it was collected in 1978 by “an employee of [the] Pacific Telephone Company.” It seems to be a standard joke/urban legend in law firms and politics.

stophittingyourself:

Spooktacular Sounds for Halloween Party!

Trick or Treat my little goblins! Do you remember those albums that were just scary sound effects and spooky music for Halloween? Well, I AM MAKING ONE OF THOSE. Do you want one? You can afford it, it is very cheap, and it lasts all FRIGHT long! Go get yours!

This is hi-scare-ious.

This is just a reminder that the Superfly soundtrack is incredible.

(Source: Spotify)

Pink and Blue

Easier, that is, unless you want to buy your daughter something that isn’t pink. Girls’ obsession with that color may seem like something they’re born with, like the ability to breathe or talk on the phone for hours on end. But according to Jo Paoletti, an associate professor of American studies at the University of Maryland, it ain’t so. When colors were first introduced to the nursery in the early part of the 20th century, pink was considered the more masculine hue, a pastel version of red. Blue, with its intimations of the Virgin Mary, constancy and faithfulness, was thought to be dainty. Why or when that switched is not clear, but as late as the 1930s a significant percentage of adults in one national survey held to that split. Perhaps that’s why so many early Disney heroines — Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Wendy, Alice-in-Wonderland — are swathed in varying shades of azure. (Purple, incidentally, may be the next color to swap teams: once the realm of kings and N.F.L. players, it is fast becoming the bolder girl’s version of pink.)

                -NYTimes Magazine, December 24, 2006 What’s Wrong with Cinderella by Peggy Orenstein

questionableadvice:

~ The Southern Illinois Record, August 6, 1914via Illinois Digital Archives

"You will have all of the standard human traits."Also, finding out that I share a birth month with Robert Green Ingersoll makes me happy.

questionableadvice:

~ The Southern Illinois Record, August 6, 1914
via Illinois Digital Archives

"You will have all of the standard human traits."

Also, finding out that I share a birth month with Robert Green Ingersoll makes me happy.

The toughest thing about the shield was making it believable that [Captain America] could throw this thing, have it bounce off something, then take some guy out and have it come back to him. We tried some practical stuff, where he’s throwing a rubber shield. Nothing worked until we handed it over to Chris Evans, until we said, ‘Okay, we’ve got this shield. It’s this wide, it weighs this much. What would you do? How would you throw it?’ And he came up with some really interesting ways of doing it. He had nothing in his hands, he was just miming the actions. It was basically Chris Evans’ ability to mime throwing and catching the shield that made it work.”

- Joe Johnston, director, Captain America: The First Avenger

Object work is important.

(Source: durance, via daisyrosario)

ohnojackchick:

I DON’T KNOW

ohnojackchick:

I DON’T KNOW

Nina Simone

But [Lorraine] Hansberry offered her a special bond. A young woman also dealing with a startling early success—Hansberry was twenty-eight when “A Raisin in the Sun” won the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award, in 1959—she had a strongly cultivated black pride and a pedagogical bent. “We never talked about men or clothes,” Simone wrote in her memoir, decades later. “It was always Marx, Lenin and revolution—real girls’ talk.”

…In early August [1963], she sang “Brown Baby” before a crowd gathered in the football stadium of a black college outside Birmingham—the first integrated concert ever given in the area—while guards with guns and dogs prowled the field. But Hansberry only started a process that events in America quickly accelerated. Simone watched the March on Washington, later that August, on television, while she was preparing for a club date. She was still rehearsing when, on September 15th, news came of the bombing of Birmingham’s Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, killing four young African-American girls who had just got out of Bible class. Simone’s first impulsive act, she recalled, was to try to make a zip gun with tools from her garage. “I had it in my mind to go out and kill someone,” she wrote. “I didn’t yet know who, but someone I could identify as being in the way of my people.”

-from A Raised Voice, by Claudia Roth Pierpoint. The New Yorker, August 11th & 18th, 2014

Nº. 1 of  89