Nº. 1 of  92

Quoz

magictransistor:

Hand-colored woodcut print depicting a ‘Western craftsman’ in a fit of rage, as he  dismantles an uncooperative chair with a hatchet (University of Tsukuba Library), Japan, 1873.

goddamned chair

magictransistor:

Hand-colored woodcut print depicting a ‘Western craftsman’ in a fit of rage, as he dismantles an uncooperative chair with a hatchet (University of Tsukuba Library), Japan, 1873.

goddamned chair

(Source: publicdomainreview.org)

connorratliff:

If you’ve never heard an Elvis Costello song before, might I suggest this one?

For my money, Costello doesn’t get much better than the final 3 songs on King Of America and the last 3 songs on Blood & Chocolate, the TWO albums he released in 1986. None of them are among his “hits” and they aren’t typically among the first two dozen songs most people mention when they talk about Costello, but they collectively sum up a lot of what makes Costello great. They are catchy and smart and full of feeling.

This one is probably the closest to a “love song” among them, but it is a song that is tinged with regret while also being an uncharacteristically “happy” song for Costello. It’s about a guy who has made the the shift from a womanizer to become “the love of one true heart.”

OH MAN IT IS A GREAT SONG

Costello knows it, too. He pretty much stopped playing it after 1987, but since he re-introduced it to the live set in 2013, he’s played it more often than he ever did back when he was touring to promote King Of America.

(Source: musicisthefutureofmusic)

in soviet russia

in soviet russia

(Source: inthetwilightzone, via inthetwilightzone)

magictransistor:

John Tunnard, Reclamation (Oil paint and gouache on board), 1944.

magictransistor:

John Tunnard, Reclamation (Oil paint and gouache on board), 1944.

(Source: tate.org.uk)

ri-science:

The Ames Room

The distorted room was named after ophthalmologist Adelbert Ames, who invented the optical illusion in 1934. The floor, ceiling and side walls of the room are trapezoidal in shape but when viewed from a specific fixed point it appears to be rectangular.

We built this for the 2011 Christmas Lectures. See it in action in this clip from the lectures, or hear Andy talk about making it here.

Safe

from Little Nothings, Volume 4, by Lewis Trondheim

magictransistor:

Ivo Saliger

"c’mon man, cut it out. this is starting to get creepy"

magictransistor:

Ivo Saliger

"c’mon man, cut it out. this is starting to get creepy"

Defensiveness

improvnonsense:

This is an essay about the natural defensiveness that rises up in improv and can hold us back. But to get there, I want to talk about a very common way to start a scene, and that’s the “explain this” method.

EXPLAIN THIS FUNNY THING

"Hey, Bill, you want to tell me why you brought a ten course buffet to eat on your desk at work?"

(Newer improvisers: don’t worry that this is a question —- it’s adding information so it’s not a the kind of question we worry about.)

It’s the “I’m giving you an unusual thing, now you explain it” initiation. You’re expecting that the other person will give some fun reason for what you endowed them with, and then you’ve got a game.

Maybe the person answers: “Yeah, man, I don’t want to get up. Working for that promotion, so I don’t have time to go to nice restaurants so I’m bringing the nice restaurants to ME.”

Some people, by the way, feel that that initiator should maybe supply the explanation also —- something like “I know you’re trying to treat yourself better, but could you not bring a ten course buffet to work for your lunch?” That’s got its problems too (too much information, your ‘why’ might be too inorganic and forced) — and besides, the way I describe above is a way that it just seems to naturally happen a lot. First person gives a weird thing, second explains why. 

EXPLAIN THIS CRITICISM

But an interesting side effect with the “explain this” beginning is when the gift in the initiation is not clearly funny and maybe just a sort of criticism.

"Hey, Randy, did you eat my sandwich from the fridge?"

Often, you can see the other person start to just say “No, I didn’t.” But then they remember that they are supposed to yes-and and so instead they DEFLECT it, by just having a reasonable explanation. 

Read More

comicbookcovers:

Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #139, July 1971, cover by Jack Kirby, Vince Colletta, and Murphy Anderson

This cover asks whether we’re ready for this as if we haven’t been waiting our whole goddamned lives for two Rickles, exactly as the prophecies foretold.

comicbookcovers:

Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #139, July 1971, cover by Jack Kirby, Vince Colletta, and Murphy Anderson

This cover asks whether we’re ready for this as if we haven’t been waiting our whole goddamned lives for two Rickles, exactly as the prophecies foretold.

Nº. 1 of  92