Nº. 1 of  90

Quoz

joekeatinge:

Happy 97th Birthday, Jack Kirby.

Your party favor is 170 of his double page spreads

Jack Kirby and I share a birthday. August 28th, aka “Awesome Day”

(via hodgman)

magictransistor:

Terry Gilliam. Brazil. Embassy International. 1985.

halphillips:

clickholeofficial:


5 Tips To Fuck Good


This is really funny. This is the Midnite Vultures of comedy articles.

halphillips:

clickholeofficial:

5 Tips To Fuck Good

This is really funny. This is the Midnite Vultures of comedy articles.

npr:

There’s a tune that you’ve probably heard throughout your life. It’s nine notes long, and it’s almost always used to signal that something vaguely Asian is happening or is about to happen.

You know what I’m talking about. The tune’s most prominent role is probably in that 1974 song, “Kung Fu Fighting.” It comes in right as Carl Douglas is singing that anthemic “Oh-hoh-hoh-hoah.”

The tune is ubiquitous. And like many things that are just in the air, few ever ask where it came from. But we did.

How The ‘Kung Fu Fighting’ Melody Came To Represent Asia

Photo credits: (Top) Michael Putland/Getty Images and Courtesy of Martin Nilsson

(via sebsational)

claireayoublaughingatthings:

airspaniel:

drunkwario:

Anon hate from the late 1800’s.

What I love most about this is that this person was SO INCENSED at the recipient that they couldn’t even wait the days/weeks it would take for the mail to go through. No, they had to say “FUCK YOU” as soon as fucking possible and, AND, let the recipient that they were not done with the fuck you, nay, this was merely the first volley in what would undoubtably be a dressing down of Biblical proportions.

!!!!!

This is not from the 1800s. This version of the Western Union form was not used until the 1960s, as you can see in this telegram sent to JFK. Earlier versions looked different (1919, 1937, 1942) . But here’s some more: actual telegrams had text that was, in general, cut out and glued to the telegram form (for instance, this example from 1959), not actually typed onto the form. Occasionally, telegrams were typed directly onto the form, but if so this was done with a standard typewriter. The typeface here looks (to my untrained eye) like Futura, or a variant. Futura was invented in 1927, and would not be a typeface used for telegrams, as it would have to be set, which too time-intensive a process for telegrams. Also, notice that all the parts of the telegram that would normally indicate date, sender, et cetera, are not filled out. This is not a telegram that was ever sent.
So where is this from? Possibly an urban legend from the 1970s, according to this book about urban legends.The book gives no information about this being an actual telegram that was sent, it simply states that it was collected in 1978 by “an employee of [the] Pacific Telephone Company.” It seems to be a standard joke/urban legend in law firms and politics.

claireayoublaughingatthings:

airspaniel:

drunkwario:

Anon hate from the late 1800’s.

What I love most about this is that this person was SO INCENSED at the recipient that they couldn’t even wait the days/weeks it would take for the mail to go through. No, they had to say “FUCK YOU” as soon as fucking possible and, AND, let the recipient that they were not done with the fuck you, nay, this was merely the first volley in what would undoubtably be a dressing down of Biblical proportions.

!!!!!

This is not from the 1800s. This version of the Western Union form was not used until the 1960s, as you can see in this telegram sent to JFK. Earlier versions looked different (1919, 19371942) . But here’s some more: actual telegrams had text that was, in general, cut out and glued to the telegram form (for instance, this example from 1959), not actually typed onto the form. Occasionally, telegrams were typed directly onto the form, but if so this was done with a standard typewriter. The typeface here looks (to my untrained eye) like Futura, or a variant. Futura was invented in 1927, and would not be a typeface used for telegrams, as it would have to be set, which too time-intensive a process for telegrams. Also, notice that all the parts of the telegram that would normally indicate date, sender, et cetera, are not filled out. This is not a telegram that was ever sent.

So where is this from? Possibly an urban legend from the 1970s, according to this book about urban legends.The book gives no information about this being an actual telegram that was sent, it simply states that it was collected in 1978 by “an employee of [the] Pacific Telephone Company.” It seems to be a standard joke/urban legend in law firms and politics.

stophittingyourself:

Spooktacular Sounds for Halloween Party!

Trick or Treat my little goblins! Do you remember those albums that were just scary sound effects and spooky music for Halloween? Well, I AM MAKING ONE OF THOSE. Do you want one? You can afford it, it is very cheap, and it lasts all FRIGHT long! Go get yours!

This is hi-scare-ious.

This is just a reminder that the Superfly soundtrack is incredible.

(Source: Spotify)

Pink and Blue

Easier, that is, unless you want to buy your daughter something that isn’t pink. Girls’ obsession with that color may seem like something they’re born with, like the ability to breathe or talk on the phone for hours on end. But according to Jo Paoletti, an associate professor of American studies at the University of Maryland, it ain’t so. When colors were first introduced to the nursery in the early part of the 20th century, pink was considered the more masculine hue, a pastel version of red. Blue, with its intimations of the Virgin Mary, constancy and faithfulness, was thought to be dainty. Why or when that switched is not clear, but as late as the 1930s a significant percentage of adults in one national survey held to that split. Perhaps that’s why so many early Disney heroines — Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Wendy, Alice-in-Wonderland — are swathed in varying shades of azure. (Purple, incidentally, may be the next color to swap teams: once the realm of kings and N.F.L. players, it is fast becoming the bolder girl’s version of pink.)

                -NYTimes Magazine, December 24, 2006 What’s Wrong with Cinderella by Peggy Orenstein

questionableadvice:

~ The Southern Illinois Record, August 6, 1914via Illinois Digital Archives

"You will have all of the standard human traits."Also, finding out that I share a birth month with Robert Green Ingersoll makes me happy.

questionableadvice:

~ The Southern Illinois Record, August 6, 1914
via Illinois Digital Archives

"You will have all of the standard human traits."

Also, finding out that I share a birth month with Robert Green Ingersoll makes me happy.

Nº. 1 of  90